• Twitter

Countries We Serve

There are more than 163 million orphans around the world. Orphan Outreach is working to improve the lives of orphans and at-risk children in Guatemala, Honduras, India, Kenya, Latvia, Russia and the United States through early intervention, quality education and evangelism.

Guatemala

UNICEF estimates that are more than 370,000 orphans in Guatemala. Many of these children come from families facing tremendous poverty; 70 percent of people in Guatemala live below the poverty level. Orphan Outreach serves children in extreme poverty situations in Guatemala by partnering with local orphanages, churches, and Christian schools. We make it a priority to work alongside Guatemalan nationals as they serve their own children. Orphan Outreach provides support and brings mission teams to our programs in Guatemala. Read below to learn more about our programs. Click here to view our educational and community programs in Guatemala.

Honduras

Honduras is one of the poorest countries in Latin America with nearly two thirds of the nation's population living below the poverty line. UNICEF estimates there are over 170,000 orphans in Honduras. Orphan Outreach ministers in Honduras by partnering with local orphanages, churches, and Christian schools for children in extreme poverty situations. We also make it a priority to come alongside the Honduran nationals and work with them as they serve their own people. Our primary project is partnering with the AFE (Love, Faith and Hope) school that serves children and families working at the dump in Tegucigalpa. Read below to learn more about our Honduras partner programs. Click here to view our educational programs in Honduras.

India

The needs in India are overwhelming. India has approximately three times the population of the United States living in one third of the space. Introduce intense poverty, famine, drought, natural disasters, and AIDS, and you have a recipe for tragedy and most significantly, vulnerable children. India has the largest number of estimated orphans and vulnerable children in the world — 31 million. In addition, 60,000 children a year are born with HIV in India and that number continues to significantly increase. Orphan Outreach makes it a priority to come alongside Indian nationals and work with them as they serve their own people. Orphan Outreach provides vital support for several important projects in India. Read below to learn more about our India partner programs. Click here to learn more about our programs in India.

Kenya

More than a half of Kenya’s population lives below the poverty line, on less than one US dollar a day. The most vulnerable are families and children living in the urban slums, in the arid lands of northern Kenya and in areas of the country worst affected by HIV. These are also the areas with high child mortality and low enrollment in school. UNICEF reports that out of an estimated 2.4 million orphans and vulnerable children in need of care and support, about 1.2 million are believed to be due to rising AIDS mortality. Orphan Outreach’s ministry in Kenya began with a vision trip in the fall of 2012. Orphan Outreach’s primary current project is partnering with a school in Bungoma, an impoverished, rural town in northwest Kenya. In addition, Orphan Outreach is providing for urgent needs and humanitarian aid to several schools and orphanages serving children that reside in the worst slums of Nairobi. Click here to learn more about our programs in Kenya.

LATVIA

Latvia gained independence from the former Soviet Union in September 1991. From 1991 on, Latvia has been experiencing a transition period, from state-controlled economy to market economy. As with many Eastern European countries, Latvia has thousands of orphan children, most of whom are social orphans. These children are victims of abuse and/or the desperate financial situation in Latvia. In addition to relationships with several government run orphanages, Orphan Outreach’s primary project in Latvia is the Day Center. Click here to learn more about our programs in Latvia.

Russia

When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, its shaky orphan care system also fell. Alcohol consumption increased to 10 times the U.S. level. The instances of divorce also climbed, along with the HIV-infection rate, which is now one of the highest in the world. Currently, there are over 750,000 children in the orphanage system and hundreds of thousands more living in the streets. The goal of Orphan Outreach in Russia is to involve and empower local churches to care for orphans. The ministry focus is on orphan graduates who are leaving the orphanage system. Orphan Outreach provides support and brings mission teams to several orphanages in Russia. Read below to learn more about our primary programs.
Click here to learn more about our programs in Russia.


Ukraine

When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, Ukraine gained its’ independence from Russia. The Ukraine orphanage system is similar to Russia where children reside in orphanages who have been abandoned or taken from their homes in cases of neglect or abuse. There are approximately 95,000 children in Ukraine orphanages and these children have to leave the orphanage by the time they are 16 or 17. The statistics for what happens to these children upon graduation is heartbreaking as the vast majority end up in drugs, prostitution, trafficking, and suicide. Orphan Outreach began working with Life Point Church in Maryland as a consultant to assist in the development of a program for orphan graduates in Dniepro, Ukraine called Alpha Life. Click here to learn more about our work in Ukraine.

United States

On any given day, there are approximately 400,000 children in out-of-home care in the United States. Last year, 11 percent of the children (over 26,000) exited foster care "aging out"of the system. Research has shown that teens aging out of the system are highly likely as adults to experience homelessness, poor health, unemployment, incarceration, and other difficult futures.

What does it mean to “age out?” At the age of 18, foster kids are removed from the system and sent out into the “real world.” After being expelled from the system that served as their surrogate family, the new adults are suddenly faced with an uncertain future. Loneliness and despair often ensue due to their not being prepared to make it on their own. This is in stark contrast to students that grow up in traditional families. They enjoy the support of their family as they transition into being on their own during the college years. Not so for “aged-out” foster care students. Click here to learn more about our programs in the United States.
Account Login
*
*

SpaceBar Account Login
SpaceBar Pledge to Pray
The gift of prayer is the greatest gift you can give a child in need.
Join the Orphan Outreach Prayer Email
and help pray for the children we serve.




SpaceBar Recent Posts SpaceBar Twitter Feeds